Remembering one who gave all for his co-workers on 9/11

The name of Rick Rescorla engraved at the site of the World Trade Center in New York. I shot this in May 2018. Photo by Baron Sekiya
The name of Rick Rescorla engraved at the site of the World Trade Center in New York. I shot this in May 2018. Photo by Baron Sekiya

One of the names we remember today is Rick Rescorla an American hero who gave everything on September 11, 2001, to save all his co-workers in the World Trade Center attacks. Originally a British soldier hailing from Hayle, Cornwall who joined the U.S. Army to serve in Vietnam and ultimately was a security officer for Morgan Stanley. Rescorla got all of his fellow employees out of the South Tower before it fell.

If you haven’t read his amazing story you owe yourself a great read with Heart of a Soldier.

Protect yourself from scammers stealing your phone numbers

Scammers have been transferring phone numbers on T-Mobile (though we have heard some other cell carriers are affected too but these are instructions for T-Mobile) out to their own phones so they can exploit any 2-Factor Authentication you use via SMS. This is called number porting when a number is ported over to another account or carrier.

Often we have 2FA set-up for email, bank and other online accounts. If someone steals your phone number then they will be able to possibly hack into these online accounts.

You should enable a Port Validation PIN for your T-Mobile account.

  1. Dial 611
  2. Tell them, “I want to enable port locking for my account”
  3. You will need to give them a password of your choosing 6-15 digits (numbers only).

This will protect you from a scammer transferring any phone numbers in your account unless they know this special PIN. I suggest making it a long one as your will rarely have to use it anyway.

  • This DOES NOT change your T-Mobile account web login password.
  • This replaces the four digit PIN they used to ask for sometimes if you changed services.